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10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

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10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

Last week i wrote an article about 42 people who changed the internet , but no single  woman was mentioned.But that doesn’t mean that the Internet is lacking in talented women. like the popular saying  What a man can do , a woman can do better………… Critics say that these women were not given enough recognition for their efforts unlike the men and in many instances, Yes  they are right. Not to say that all of them go unnoticed but you might not have heard of some or most of them.Today i am going to share with you  10 women who significantly contributed to how we use the Internet today.

 

1. Radia Perlman

This list wouldn’t be complete if we don’t revisit history and include Radia Perlman who is widely hailed as the Mother of the Internet. Perlman is most famous for creating the spanning-tree protocol (STP). STP bridges two computer networks so that they can exchange information. You can see its usage in Local Area Networks (LAN) where many computers are accessing one network and the Ethernet.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

STP made the Internet possible, as it allows the Ethernet to handle large amounts of information being exchanged and stored which set the precedent of cloud computing. As a software designer and network engineer, Perlman is also credited with inventing the Transparent Interconnection of Lots of Links (TRILL) to make up for STP’sshortcomings.

2. Elizabeth Feinler

Wired described Elizabeth Feinler as the person “before Google and GoDaddy”. Feinler is considered the pioneer of the Internet when she was the Director of the Network Information Center (NIC) at the Standford Research Institute (SRI) from 1972 to 1989. She also managed the ARPANET, the network that connected various research centers across the country, which was seen as the predecessor to the Internet.

10 Women Who Changed

via Wired

Feinler was more commonly known as Jake, a nickname given by her sister that stuck. In managing the NIC, Feinler oversaw the creation and registration of Internet addresses or URLs. It first started out manually with Feinler and her team maintaining and publishing directories of people. The resources were distributed via snail mail and was also available through a telephone hotline the team set up.

 

Over time as the Internet evolved, the NIC came up with the Dormain Name System (DNS). DNS maintains the naming scheme of URLs such as .com, .edu, .gov, .mil, .net, .org as well as translating domain names into IP adresses. Needless to say, these contributions of hers are still in use today.

3. Caterina Fake

Caterina Fake co-founded with her husband Stewart Butterfield popular photo-sharing site Flickr in 2004. Yahoo! then acquired Flickr in 2005. Before Flickr came about, photo-sharing meant sending your pictures through email. And you know how sending photos via email was years ago when emails couldn’t handle attaching photos in bulk.

10Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via FamousWiki

Additionally, the existence of Flickr also brought about the advent of many of Web 2.0′s features like social networking, tagging, algorithms that bring up popular content, and community open APIs. Interestingly the site was meant to be a multi-player gaming site until lack of funds spurred Fake and her husband to change tack.

4. Mitchell Baker

If it weren’t for Mitchell Baker, most of us would still be browsing the Web with Internet Explorer. As Executive Chairwoman of the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation, Baker led part of Netscapes team on the Mozilla project. The project, as you can tell from the name, birthed the open source web browser, Mozilla Firefox, which made the Internet experience safe and stable.

10Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via Wired

Trained as a lawyer, Baker used her expertise to create Netscape’s open source license, making it free as well as the basis of Mozilla’s public license. It helped pave an era of open source software and inspired open source projects such as GitHub, HTML5 and Android.

5. Rashmi Sinha

If it wasn’t for India-born Rashmi Sinha, there wouldn’t be SlideShare. Sinha caught the Web bug when she was researching on how search engine optimization as well as algorithms work to help push recommended content at the University of California, Berkeley. After her research, she went on to start a user-experience consultancy Uzanto which provided services to companies such as eBay, AAA, and Blue Shield.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via women2.com

In 2006, Sinha and her husband Jon Boutelle co-founded SlideShare. She became its CEO while her husband is the CTO. As you know, the site makes it possible to share PowerPoint slides online without the need of a presenter. SlideShare’s user-based community and user-friendliness draws people to discover new content as well as generates its own traffic. In 2012, LinkedIn acquired the presentation-sharing site for over $100 million.

6. Leah Culver

You may not have heard of social networking site Pownce, as it met its early demise in 2008. Many attributed it to the acquisition by software company Six Apart, who was after the talented staff of Pownce, which was then Twitter’s biggest competitor. What almost nobody focused on is that it’s possibly the reason why Facebook and Twitter is now able to share and attach links, files, photos and videos on their platforms. And the women behind it is Leah Culver.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via Wikimedia

Interestingly Culver switched her art major for computer programming when studying at the University of Minnesota. A year after she graduated in 2006, she launched Pownce with Kevin Rose and Daniel Burka. Culver is the lead developer for Pownce having created the site from scratch using the Python programming language.

7. Marissa Mayer

Currently, Marissa Mayer is the president and CEO of Yahoo!. Before that however, everyone knew her as Google’s employee number 20 in 1999 and the search engine’s first female engineer. Anyone who is tech news savvy will know that Mayer worked on a slew of Google services that we all use. Among them are Google Search, Google News, Google Images, and Google Chrome.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via The Drum

Her attention to detail and user-first mindset contributed to the look and feel of these products. She was so good at her job that she became Vice President of Search Products and User Experience. In her final two years at Google, she was made Vice President of Local, Maps, and Location Services. In this division, she oversaw the engineering and design of Google Maps, Google Earth, Street View and local search for both web and mobile.

8. Mena Trott

Mena Trott made it possible for us aspiring writers to start out by blogging. In fact, she made it easy to blog. Trott co-founded Six Apart with now former husband Benjamin in 2001 that specializes in developing blogging software. The company came up with Movable Type in 2001, a blogging software that is similar to and precedes WordPress.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via Bloomberg Businessweek

Before Six Apart and Movable Type, blogging meant hard-coding your own online diary. In 2003, Trott and her team came up with blog hosting service, TypePad, based on Movable Type’s software and features easy-to-use blogging tools. Some of the tools include multiple author support, photo albums and mobile blogging. Six Apart eventually came up with blogging platform Vox and acquired Livejournal before it finally joined forces with VideoEgg to become SAY Media in 2010.

9. Susan Wojcicki

Another Google employee, Susan Wojcicki was responsible for selling ads on the search engine giant. Recently made the CEO of YouTube in February 2014, Wojcicki used to lead Google’s Advertising and Commerce division. She first started out as Google employee number 16 as its Marketing Manager and if it weren’t for her renting out her garage to Sergey Brin and Larry Page in 1998, there would be no Google.

10 Women Who Changed How We Use The Internet

via Ad Age

During her tenure as Vice President of Advertising and Commerce, Wojcicki came up with AdWords and AdSense. The 2 advertising services are why you see ads on websites and blogs today which contributed 96% to Google’s revenue. Wojcicki is also the person responsible for acquiring YouTube and DoubleClick as well as developing the doodles on Google’s home pag

NOW TO YOU

Who do you think should be on this list , that is not there, feel free to share it with us by using our comment box below. So what do you think?

 

content idea : hongkiat

 

 

 

 

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Emmanuel

    September 28, 2014 at 5:01 pm

    Among all those names there, the only name I have heard of was Marissa and I got to know about her the day she was made CEO of yahoo.

    To be frank with you, this is my first time hearing of these women and the magnificent contribution they made in this world of internet.

  2. Shaun Hoobler

    October 16, 2014 at 11:28 am

    Gotta love these women. They made the internet a better place.

  3. Rohan Bhardwaj

    November 1, 2014 at 8:33 pm

    Hi buddy,

    Awesome compilation of great achievements by wonderful women. I am happy about the women who rented the garage to Larry Page and his friend, I would be devastated if there was no Google.

    Al have immensely benefited the world, there is no way I can imagine internet and my daily activity without all this services.

    Take care.

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NCDMB: The agency providing funding, incubation and mentorship opportunities for technology startups and innovators

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Win up to $10,000 Seed Funding in the NCDMB Oil & Gas Technology Hackathon 

The Nigerian Oil and Gas Technology (NOGTECH) programme is the first ever Oil and Gas hackathon with the primary aim of fostering innovations in the oil and gas industry as well as creating a platform for the proliferation of local content. The programme is headlined by the Nigerian Content Development and Monitoring Board (NCDMB) with partnership from Learners Support Consultancy and BrentHub.

NOGTECH aims to address the challenges faced by the nation’s oil and gas industry and its linkage sectors by ideating, developing and prototyping digital technology solutions that solve these pertinent problems. The programme is promoting innovation by offering seed funding, business mentorship and incubation to the winning ideas.

Call for Submissions

The Executive Secretary of NCDMB, Engr. Simbi Kesiye Wabote, disclosed that “five teams will get $10,000 equity-free grants each”.

 

 

In a webinar session titled “Innovating for the future of Nigeria’s Oil & Gas Industry and its Linkage Sectors.”, Engr. Wabote revealed that submissions into the programme will be scrutinised based on several factors.

”Participants must be a team/company of at least two or more members with at least 75 percent of the founding team as Nigerians. The team/company must be a registered, or intending to register as a profit/business entity. The solution described in response to the challenge must be driven by digital technology – Software, Hardware or both.”

He also disclosed that “the solution must either be at the ideation stage, prototype level or a launched solution that hasn’t gained commercial traction. The team must be available to participate in a three-day hackathon as well as a three-month incubation programme, if selected.”

Solving the Industry’s Toughest Challenges

NCDMB is determined to unearth scalable solutions to the industry’s biggest challenges. Some of the identified problem areas include the rising problem of pipeline vandalism, increase in cyber-physical risk, widening skill gap, supply chain and logistics inefficiency, rising carbon footprint and issues surrounding transparency, accountability and civic engagement.

Innovators are encouraged to proffer sustainable and scalable solutions to these biggest challenges faced by industry stakeholders.

Pitching to Investors

Ultimately, the winning teams will have an opportunity to pitch their prototypes to investors. But before then, the NOGTECH programme is taking place over several weeks with the selected ideas advancing on a stage by stage basis.

The first stage is the call for submissions where teams and startups are encouraged to submit their ideas. Shortlisted teams in each of the challenge areas will first be invited to present online to a team of experienced entrepreneurs and industry professionals. The most promising teams will then be selected to participate in an all-expense paid 3-day hackathon. Submit your ideas here

During this time, shortlisted participants will have a couple of days to collaborate and build their prototypes or fine-tune existing prototypes with guidance from industry stakeholders, experts and mentors. At the end of the bootcamp, teams will revalidate their solutions and have the opportunity to pitch to a panel of judges.

Prizes for Winning Teams

The winning five teams will undergo a 3-month incubation program where each team will get a $10,000 equity-free grant, a work-space, expert mentors, global partners and unprecedented market access over three-months, ensuring they become commercial and investor-ready.

At the end of the incubation, the teams will participate in a showcase day to demonstrate their progress. This showcase will aim to connect them with investors and industry stakeholders where they can further amplify their market access.

So if you are an innovator seeking opportunities, identifying them and seizing the ones that then match, then you have to apply to NOGTECH.

In order to participate in the hackathon, innovators, teams and startups can get started here.

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Slack announces Connect, an improved way for companies to talk to one another

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Virtual events are the new norm for product rollouts in 2020, with Slack taking to the internet earlier today to talk about a new part of its service called Slack Connect.

On the heels of Apple’s lengthy and pretty good virtual WWDC that took place earlier this week, Slack’s event, part experiment and part press conference, was called to detail the firm’s new Slack Connect capability, which will allow companies to better link together and communicate inside of their Slack instance than what was possible with its shared channels feature. The product was described inside of a business-to-business context, including examples about companies needing to chat with agencies and other external vendors.

In its most basic form, Slack is well-known for internal chat functionality, helping teams talk amongst themselves. Slack Connect appears to be a progression past that idea, pushing internal communications tooling to allow companies to plug their private comms into the private comms of other orgs, linking them for simple communication while keeping the entire affair secure.

Slack Connect, a evolution past what shared channels offered, includes better security tooling and the ability to share channels across 20 orgs. The enterprise SaaS company is also working to give Connect-using companies “the ability to form DM connections independent of channels,” the company told TechCrunch.

The product could slim down email usage; if Slack Connect can let many orgs chat amongst themselves, perhaps fewer emails will be needed to keep different companies in sync. That said, Slack is hardly a quiet product. During his part of the presentation, Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield noted that the service sees up to 65 million messages sent each second at peak times.

According to the CEO, Slack Connect has been piloted for a few months, and is now available for paid plans.

Slack shares are off 3.8% today, before the news came out. Its broader company cohort (SaaS) are also down today, along with the market more broadly; investors don’t appear to have reacted to this piece of news, at least yet.

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Apple has acquired Fleetsmith, a startup that helps IT manage Apple devices remotely

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At a time when IT has to help employees set up and manage devices remotely, a service that simplifies those processes could certainly come in handy. Apple recognized that, and acquired Fleetsmith today, a startup that helps companies do precisely that with Apple devices.

While Apple didn’t publicize the acquisition, it has confirmed the deal with TechCrunch, while Fleetsmith announced the deal in a company blog post. Neither company was sharing the purchase price.

The startup has built technology that takes advantage of Apple’s Device Enrollment Program, allowing IT departments to bring devices online as soon as the employee takes it out of the box and powers it up.

At the time of its $30 million Series B funding last year, CEO Zack Blum explained the company’s core value proposition: “From a customer perspective, they can ship devices directly to their employees. The employee unwraps it, connects to Wi-Fi and the device is enrolled automatically in Fleetsmith,” Blum explained at that time.

Over time, the company has layered on other useful pieces beyond automating device registration, like updating devices automatically with OS and security updates, while letting IT see a dashboard of the status of all devices under management, all in a pretty slick interface.

While Apple will in all likelihood continue to work with Jamf, the leader in the Apple device management space, this acquisition gives the company a remote management option at a time when it’s essential with so many employees working from home.

Fleetsmith, which has raised more than $40 million from investors, like Menlo Ventures, Tiger Global Management, Upfront Ventures and Harrison Metal, will continue to sell the product through the company website, according to the blog post.

The founders put a happy face on the deal, as founders tend to do. “We’re thrilled to join Apple. Our shared values of putting the customer at the center of everything we do without sacrificing privacy and security, means we can truly meet our mission, delivering Fleetsmith to businesses and institutions of all sizes, around the world,” they wrote.

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